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20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
's deficit. let's go to clayton. >> big story making headlines this morning. several days after the attack on the u.s. consulate. this is the story that the obama administration was sticking to. listen. >> this was not a preplanned premeditated attack that what happened initially was it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo as a consequence of the video. >> our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was, in fact, initially a spontaneous reaction. >> what our assessment is as of the president is in fact what it began spontaneously in benghazi as a reaction to what had transpired some hours earlier in cairo. >> but as fox news reports, the administration knew within the first 24 hours that it was a terrorist attack. so why were americans left in the dark and how could potential coverup impact the election? here for fair and balanced debate is fox news contributor angela mcglowan and mclavigne. this seems like a big problem for the president. >> i don't see it that way. look, the president came out the morning after the attacks on september 12th. came o
president obama leading and claims to correct the bias, turning romney deficits into commanding romney leads. the idea behind is it simple. all polls base the outcome on what pollsters believe the electorate will look like, how many democrats versus how many republicans they think will actually turn out. getting that partisan makeup wrong can tilt the predictions. the people that don't believe the polls say thistime, pollsters think the 2012 electorate will look a lot like 2008 and this they say is wrong. notice i said this time. back in 2004, democrats complained that the polls which showed george w. bush leading were overestimating the number of republicans who would vote. they were wrong. the polls were right. in 2000, al gore said don't believe the polls, polls showed him losing narrowly. polls were right. in fact, it's hard to find an example of the polls on average getting it wrong unless you go back to 1948, when they predicted thomas dewey defeated president harry truman. cnn political contributor ari fleischer joins us. he's an occasionally unpaid communications advisor for the romn
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)